No Pic U992.23.29
Beaded bag
Rattan; Seed Beads
Sarawak (Malaysia - Borneo)
20th century

This cylindrical bag of glass beads on woven rattan features two figures, said to represent Japanese soldiers in the jungle during World War II. There are also numerous "aso" motifs in red, white, yellow, orange, and green. In addition, there are floral motifs in the band at the top of the bag and zig-zag decorations at the base. The handle has geometric and floral motifs. This bag probably comes from the Kayan and Kenyah people of the central highlands, or the Kelabit and Orang Ulu groups of northeastern Sarawak.

This is an example of art inspired by war. It is from the Collection of Colin Henderson Smith and Gloria (neé Burroughs) Smith.

Bibliography: Chin and Mashman, Sarawak: Cultural Legacy; Richter, Arts and Crafts of Indonesia; Haddon, "The Dog-motive in Bornean Art," (copy in document file).
No Pic U993.3.14
Ceremonial Headdress
Rattan or Bamboo; Hornbill feathers; Monkey fur; beadwork
Sarawak (Malaysia - Borneo)
20th century

This headdress is said to be a Dyak (Bidayuh) Chief's ceremonial headdress. It is also similar to the headdresses of the Iban and Orang Ulu warriors, and uses similar materials and designs. The Iban and Bidayuh are close neighbors, and together make up the main population of Sarawak.

The hat is made of loosely plainted rattan or bamboo strips. Four hornbill feathers are stuck through the plaiting at the back of the top of the hat. The beadwork decoration is of orange, white, black, red and green of stylized "aso" motifs. The tufts of fur are probably monkey fur.

From the Collection of Colin Henderson Smith and Gloria (neé Burroughs) Smith.

Bibliography: Chin and Mashman, Sarawak: Cultural Legacy; Richter, Arts and Crafts of Indonesia; Haddon, "The Dog-motive in Bornean Art," (copy in document file).
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U993.5.1A-D
Dirk; Scabbard
Iron; Leather; Wood; Brass
Scotland, c. 1712

This dirk and scabbard were part of a donation which also included the Targe, now displayed on the wall behind the case. The dirk has a wooden grip with Celtic interlace designs. There is a brass pommel cap with a circle and heart design on the end with a locking screw. The blade is of iron and has the words, "Fear God and Do Kil" inscribed on it. On the right side of the blade near the grip is a design, the initials JR in scroll, and the numbers 1712. This probably notes the initials of the owner and the date of manufacture.

The scabbard is of dried leather with a brass tip and throat. A brass ring is attached to the back. On the front of the scabbard are two small pockets to hold a knife and fork. These are brass at the top and leather at the bottom. Both the knife and fork have wood handles with a brass band between the metal and wood.

From the Collection of Bruce and Dorothy Brown.
No Pic U991.7.8
Blow Dart Container
Bamboo; Rattan
Borneo, 19th century

Similar to other containers from the region, this was probably made to hold darts for the blowpipe. From the Collection of Bruce and Dorothy Brown.

Bibliography: Richter, Arts and Crafts of Indonesia.
No Pic U991.7.1
Blowpipe
Wood; Metal
Borneo, 19th Century

The blowpipe is formed of hollowed wood, with a metal spearpoint attached. From the Collection of Bruce and Dorothy Brown.
No Pic U991.7.2
Blowpipe
Wood; Metal
Borneo, 19th Century

This is a similar example, but slightly longer than the previous item. From the Collection of Bruce and Dorothy Brown.
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U991.7.11A-B
Kukri; Sheath
Metal; Wood; Leather
Nepal, n.d.

Nepalese Gurkha "kukri." From the Collection of Bruce and Dorothy Brown.

This display includes two expamles of the "keris" or "kris". The kris is a long dagger with a blade that is either straight or formed with a number of curves like a wavering flame or a serpent. There are regional variations in hilts, blade forms and names for the class of Indonesian stabbing weapons to which the kris belongs. Some blades are composed of welded layers of iron and nickel, beaten and folded many times to obtain bright and dark patterns. Names of the blade shapes are derived from proverbs, episodes from the Hindu epics, natural phenomena (such as orchids, clouds in the sky or coconut milk) and the number of curves in the blade. A kris may have magical properties, and may "sigh for blood," shrivel or kill plants and animals in their vicinity, or fly invisibly through the air to wreak anonymous destruction on the enemies of their owners. Today, they are usually part of the formal male costume and no longer used as weapons.

Bibliography: Richter, Arts and Crafts of Indonesia.
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U991.7.7A-B
Keris; Scabbard
Wood; Metal
Java (Indonesia), 19th - 20th Century

This kris has a wood handle and metal blade, upon which the patterns made by its production can be seen. The sheath is of wood and metal, which is decorated with floral motifs. From the Collection of Bruce and Dorothy Brown.
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U991.7.10A-B
Keris; Scabbard
Wood; Metal; Ivory
Java (Indonesia), 19th - 20th Century

The handle of this kris is of ivory, while the blade is metal. The patterns formed during its production can be seen on the blade. The sheath is made of polished wood. From the Collection of Bruce and Dorothy Brown.
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U991.7.3
Flintlock Holster Pistol
Iron; Wood
c. 1760

This short continental Flintlock Holster Pistol has engraved iron mounts. From the Collection of Bruce and Dorothy Brown.
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U981.1.15A-B
Knife; Scabbard
Wood; Metal; Leather; Brass
West Africa, c. 1875-1901

This small knife has a scalloped edge with wooden handle and brass details. The carved leather scabbard also has brass decorations around the edge. This was part of a collection composed primarily of West African ethnological objects gathered between 1875 and 1901 by Edward Parsoné.