The items in this case represent those associated with or used by Chinese Scholar-Officials. Further research is required to add to our knowledge about these works.

No Pic M964.1.385
Incense Burner
Ceramic; Glaze
China, c. 618-906 ?

This incense burner, made in the form of a rabbit, probably dates from the T'ang or possibly, Sung Dynasty. The shape is more typical of Sung, but the style of the eyes are closer to work of the T'ang period. It is white-glazed stoneware. John and Katharine Maltwood purchased it from a dealer called Amoore, although they did not indicate the location, price, or date.

Bibliography: The Maltwood Far Eastern Collection exhibition catalog, 1982.
No Pic M964.1.56A-B
Incense Burner
Bronze; Wood
China, c. 1368-1644?

This item may be from the Ming Dynasty, and the lid is possibly a restoration. It was formerly in the collection of John and Katharine Maltwood, but further research is necessary to determine where and when they acquired it.
No Pic M964.1.381
Jardiniere; Stand
Jade; Wood
China, c. 1368-1644

This green jade jardiniere dates from at least the Ming Dynasty but was possibly made earlier. It has three "sacred fungi" feet and an engraved decoration on the exterior surface. The stand is modern. This piece was purchased by the Maltwoods in London (Bluett) on August 27, 1926.
No Pic
M964.1.285
Libation cup
Ceramic; Glaze
China, c. 1644-1911
This Libation cup of celadon glaze on porcelain probably dates from the Qing (Ch'ing) Dynasty. It was formerly in the collection of John and Katharine Maltwood.

Bibliography: The Maltwood Far Eastern Collection exhibition catalog, 1982.
No Pic M964.1.564A-B
Mandarin Rank Badge
Silk; Dye
China, n.d.

Symbolism used for the decoration of Manchu court costumes, as well as Chinese style garments had been developed over centuries. Symbols could include the dragon (the natural world, the emperor), the phoenix (the empress), bat (good fortune), mountain (earth), bird in red disk (sun), rabbit in white disk (moom, flaming pearl or wisdom), crane (long life), fungus (long life), pair of fish (domestic felicity and fertility, abundance), and various flowers representing the seasons. Additional research might reveal when and where the Maltwoods acquired this piece.

Bibliography: The Maltwood Far Eastern Collection exhibition catalog, 1982.
No Pic M964.1.412
Finial
Jade
Chinese, n.d.

This carved jade finial was part of the Maltwood Bequest. Its provenance might be learned with further research.
No Pic M964.1.413
Finial
Jade
Chinese, n.d.

This small carved jade finial or pendant was acquired by the Maltwoods. Additional research is necessary to add to our knowledge of its history.
No Pic
M964.1.352
Belt Buckle
Mutton Fat Yellow Jade
China, 19th century

This small carved jade belt buckle is decorated with a dragon. It was acquired by the Maltwoods, but how and whenmight be learned as a result of further research.
No Pic M964.1.99
Belt Buckle
White Jade ?
China, c. 220-264

This belt buckel is formed in the shape of a spiral dragon. It is probably of white jade, or possibly soapstone, and dates from the Chinese Han Dynasty. According to a remark in the document files, the corroded appearance may indicate it was long buried. It was formerly in the Duer Collection, after which the Maltwoods acquired it.
No Pic
M964.1.50
Ink reservoir ?
Wood
China, n.d.

This small carved burled bowl is probably an ink resevoir. It was part of the Maltwood's collection.

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