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The items in this case represent those associated with or used by Chinese Scholar-Officials. Unfortunately, little is known about the individual objects displayed; much research is required to add to our knowledge about these works.

No Pic M964.1.334
Ink resevoir
Ceramic; Glaze
China, c. 1736-1795

Shaped like half a peach, this blue-glazed ink reservoir dates from the Qinglong (Chien Lung) period.Additional research might reveal how and where the Maltwood acquired it.
No Pic
M964.1.434
Brushrest ?
Wood
China, n.d.

Part of the Maltwood Collection, this small wood carving has an intricate floral and leaf design. It was probably used as a brush rest.
No Pic
M964.1.300
Brushrest ?
Soapstone ?
China, n.d.

Possibly of soapstone, this carving features a figure of a sage in dragon-like clouds. It was probably used as a brush rest. Additional research is required to enjance our knowledge of this piece and how it came into the Maltwood Collection.
No Pic M964.1.77
Wrist rest; stand
Ivory; Wood
China, 19th century

This carved ivory wrist or arm rest probably dates from the Qing (Ch'ing) Dynasty (1644-1911), possibly from the reign of Kang Hsi. It features a phoenix and many little birds on one side and a branch of willow and flower on the reverse. It was purchased by the Maltwoods in Victoria, B.C. from L. L. Baily in 1939.
No Pic M964.1.386
Brush Holder; Stand
Ivory; Wood
China, c. 1644-1911?

Made from the hollow cylinder of African elephant ivory, this brush pot follows the natural shpae of the tusk. A plain wooden base has been inserted into the bottom. The exterior surface has been carved in low relief with five men in a garden setting with rocks and trees. These figures include a scholar on a rug who reads a scroll, two men engaged in a game, a man near a wine-pot, and a servant preparing food.

Ivory carving flourished during the Ming period, but became even more widespread under the Emperor Kang Hsi of the Qing (Ch'ing) Dynasty. Scholars and scholarly pursuits are often the subjects portrayed.

This brush holder was formerly part of the Duer Collection, from which it was acquired by the Maltwoods.

Bibliography: Jefferies, Condition Report (in document file); Sollien-Pick, Condition Report (in document file).
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