No Pic U996.5.1
Doll, Male
Cotton; Wool; Sealskin; Fur
Canada, c. 1966

This doll from Aklavik, Northwest Territory is included in the Arts and Leisure display. Its production and use could involve use of leisure time. This doll was donated by Veronica Fuller to the Royal British Columbia Museum from which it was recently transferred to the Maltwood Art Museum and Gallery.
No Pic U996.5.2
Doll, Female
Cotton; Wool; Sealskin; Fur
Canada, c. 1966

This doll from Aklavik, Northwest Territory is included in the Arts and Leisure display. Its production and use could involve use of leisure time. This doll was donated by Veronica Fuller to the Royal British Columbia Museum from which it was recently transferred to the Maltwood Art Museum and Gallery.
No Pic U994.4.2
Zither (Autoharp)
Wood; Lacquer; Paint; Metal
United States, c. 1865

An autoharp, or zither, has a sound box of irregular shape with tuning pegs at one end. The wire is strung from the pegs across the sound hole and secured beneath a wood cover at the bottom end of the sound box. This zither, from which the manufacturer's decal-label has been worn away, was a gift of Almer Olson of Victoria. A note which came with the zither reads, "Left to me by my mother, Hazel M. Olson who received it from her parents, William and Alice Scafe, pioneers of Victoria. Mrs. Hazel Olson died last year (c.1990), aged 90, and gave it to me, Almer L. Olson, also of Victoria. It is known to have been in the Scafe family since abut 1865 or so, in Illinois, U.S.A., and was brought by them to Victoria when they moved here in 1874. Almer L. Olson"
No Pic U994.4.76A
Mandolin
Woods
n.d.

The sound box of the mandolin is made and decorated with exotic woods. It has tuning pegs at the top of the neck, and is strung with metal wires.
No Pic U994.4.53A-B
Mouth Organ (Keluri, Keledi, or Engkerurai)
Gourd; Bamboo
Indonesia ?, 20th century

The mouth organ is a free-reed instrument of east-Asian origin. The base is usually round, but sometimes square. It is traditionally listed in the "gourd" category, because the base, or resonator, was originally made from a calabash. The number of pipes can vary, but the most widespread type of mouth organ has 17 pipes, some of which can be muted. Each pipe sounds only when the fingerhole is covered. The mouth organ from the Borneo region served as the prototype for the mouth organs of the Far East.

This mouth organ, similar to those made by the Bidayuh (Dyak), Kayan and Kajang of Sarawak and Kalimantan, has eight tubes of bamboo cut to various lengths and lashed together to form the pipes. Depending upon the ethnic group in which it is found, it is known locally as the engkerurai, "keluri", or "keledi". This mouth organ was given by Dr. Gordana Lazarevich, whose cousin obtained it in Southeast Asia.

Bibliography: Chin and Mashman, Sarawak: Cultural Legacy; Richter, Arts and Crafts of Indonesia