No Pic U993.3.1
Ceremonial Cloth
Cotton (?); Dye
Sarawak (Malaysia) or Kalimantan (Indonesia); Borneo
20th century

Ceremonial fabrics such as this have traditionally been associated with spiritual or religious uses. Today, some are being sold or sometimes reproduced with certain changes in motifs. Thus, this cloth is displayed under "Arts and Economy."

This textile has a large off-centre motif which resembles a modified diamond. Figures are shown in bands at each end of the cloth. On one side, there are two registers, the first of which has three standing or dancing figures, and a second with two. The other end has only one register, which has three figures. The sides and bottom of the cloth are decorated with "aso" and "buffalo-horn" motifs. The various symbols used suggest this might initially have had a funerary function. Textiles were often given in ceremonial settings, such as marriages where they formed part of the dowry. Some might be buried with the owner, or used as shrouds, while others might be given to those who attended the funeral. This is another way art can contribute to a society's economic system, while simultaneously having religious or functional importance.

From the Collection of Colin Henderson Smith and Gloria (neé Burroughs) Smith.

Bibliography: Haddon, "The Dog-motive in Bornean Art," (copy in document file); Chin and Mashman, Sarawak: Cultural Legacy; Richter, Arts and Crafts of Indonesia; Všlger and Welck, Indonesian Textiles: Symposium 1985 ; Solyom, Bronwen and Garrett, Fabric Traditions of Indonesia; Maxwell, Textiles of Southeast Asia: Tradition, Trade and Transformation; Textiles of Indonesia; Holmgren and Spertus, Early Indonesia Textiles from Three Island Cultures; Warming and Gaworski, The World of Indonesian Textiles;
Two of the items in the "Arts and Economy" display are "Kayan Dog" sculptures. These are probably related to the "aso" motif, which is sometimes conventionalized in beadwork, textiles and paintings as rosettes, "scorpion", and "head of prawn" patterns. These may derive from the dog, or the pig, both of which figure prominently in ceremonials. Both of these sculptures come from the Collection of Colin Henderson Smith and Gloria (neé Burroughs) Smith.
No Pic U992.23.8
Untitled; Sculpture
Wood
Sarawak-Borneo (Kayan)
20th century

The large "Kayan dog" sculpture has the head of a dog or pig and body of a man. The figure is seated, and bands are visible around the arms and legs. The hands and feet resemble paws or claws. The head has pointed ears, circular eyes in raised relief, and a gaping mouth with prominent teeth. The tip of the nose curls back to touch the top of the snout. A second, smaller dog is held by the right foot and left arm of the larger dog. The larger figure's right arm is behind its back, with its hand grasping its tail.

Bibliography: Haddon, "The Dog-motive in Bornean Art," (copy in document file); Chin and Mashman, Sarawak: Cultural Legacy; Richter, Arts and Crafts of Indonesia.
No Pic U992.23.9
Untitled; Sculpture
Wood
Sarawak-Bornero (Kayan)
20th century

This sculpture is similar to U992.23.8, but has only one smaller figure. The point of the nose extends back to the top of the snout, which also has a separate horn. The figure's right arm reaches behind its back to grasp the tail.

Bibliography: Haddon, "The Dog-motive in Bornean Art," (copy in document file); Chin and Mashman, Sarawak: Cultural Legacy; Richter, Arts and Crafts of Indonesia.
No Pic U988.17.7
Souvenir "Piggy" Bank
Ceramic
United States, 20th century

Part of the exhibit of popular culture at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History and the Festival of Cartoon Art at Ohio State, this item is an example of contemporary "commercial" art. It is included in this display as an illustration of art made for advertising and tourist souvenirs. It can also be seen as a form of art for teaching children about saving money. As such, this "piggy bank" reflects the values of society and the role of arts in shaping them.
No Pic U985.9.6
Pipe
Wood; Horn; Hair
Canada (Cree), n.d.

This pipe has a woven hair pipe stem with a wooden pipe bowl and horn stem. Part of the metal lid for the bowl is missing.
No Pic
M964.1.60
Dish; Stand
White Jade
India, n.d.

This fluted white jade dish was made in Moghul India for trade in China. It was part of the Duer Collection before it was acquired by John and Katharine Maltwood.
No Pic
U984.48.1A-D
Cups; Saucers
Ceramic; Glaze
China ?, c. 1880

These two cups and saucers are oriental tradewares from the Victoria period. One set has a blu-green background with floral and bird motifs. The second has a blue background with wine, mauve, and white floral designs. The designs are in relief applique.

They were donated by Mrs. D. E. Kennedy of Victoria. They were her great grandmother's.

Bibliography: Note in preliminary data record (document file).
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