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U994.30.50

SPAIN

1865/01/07

VEREULA. WEST END OF CHURCH

Street describes the west front of the church although he does not illustrate it: "The west front of the church has a very noble round-arched doorway, boldly recessed, and with many shafts in the jambs. Above this is a small stone inscribed with the monograms X.P. and A.(.; and then, higher a delicate line of arcading carried on slender shafts. All this work is set forward in advance of the general face of the wall. The nave and aisles were each lighted with a plain circular window, and the arcading up the eaves of the western gable still remaining shows that its pitch was always very flat."*

Bayne's sketch matches Street's description in all points. The round-arched door can also be compared to the photograph, which shows not only the floral and geometric sculpture of the recessed arches, but also the metalwork details of the wooden door. Bayne has not finished the details of the reliefs on the arches, but indicates the type of design for each order. The monograms noted by Street can be seen above the door in both Bayne's sketch and the photograph. As mentioned by Street, Bayne shows the entrance advanced from the rest of the wall and shows the plain circular windows above the door and at each side of the entrance. Street's comment about the gable "still remaining" indicates that it had sustained damage during the upheavals earlier in the century. This can also be seen in Bayne's drawing where the right side of the roof seems to have crumbled away. More damage can be seen on the left part of the entrance area.

Bayne's monogram is in the lower left, the number in the upper left, and the date and place in the lower right. The upper right has a detail of the arch mouldings and the decorative pattern of the sculpture.

* Street, Gothic Architecture in Spain, Vol. 2, 188.

U994.30.48

SPAIN

1865/01/07

VERUELA. CONVENT. APSE OF CHAPEL. NORTH TRANSEPT.

Street included an engraving of the interior of the nave of the Abbey church but described chapels on the eastern sides of the transepts.

Bayne's drawing appears to be the chapel in the north transept, although the information given in the lower right is somewhat unclear. In favour of this interpretation is the detailed drawing of the altar in the upper right. Bayne labels it as "+Ancient [?] altar. Piscina and credenza table." He notes the measurements as 3' 5 1/2" x 3' 0" x 5' 3". This altar table can be compared to Street's engraving and description of the same type, and his notice of the piscina: "Many of the old altars remain...The chapel altars are all like each other, and unlike the high altar, which is solid, whilst they are stone tables, each supported upon five detached shafts. They stand forward from the walls in the centre of the apses, and have rudely carved and planned piscinae, and credence niches on the right-hand side as you face them."*

The photograph of the choir shows the solid high altar, but also indicates the ribs and piers faithfully rendered in Bayne's sketch.

* Street, Gothic Architecture in Spain, Vol. 2, 191.

U994.30.45

SPAIN

1865/01/07

VERUELA. CONVENT. CLOISTERS, EAST WALK

Street describes "a delightful excursion to the Abbey of Veruela," a two-hours ride on a path from Tarazona.

"After riding for an hour and a half, a grand view of the whole height of Moncayo is obtained; below it to the right is a little village guarded by a picturesque castle keep, and on beyond and to the left a long line of roof, and tower, and walls girt around with trees, which seems to promise much to reward examination: and this is the old abbey of Veruela."* He states that this was the first Cistercian house in Spain, founded by Don Pedro de Atares, and his mother Teresa de Cajal.

The construction started in 1146 and was complete by 1151 when 12 French monks crossed the Pyrenees and established themselves here. Street included four illustrations in his description of this Abbey, and Bayne has five drawings and two notebook pages recording Veruela. Bayne's interest may reflect Street's evident concern for the state of the buildings following the turbulent events early in the century:

"The church at Veruela seems now to be but little frequented, the high altar alone being ever used. The stalls of the Coro are gone, and a shattered fragment of the old organ-case standing out from the wall serves only as a forlorn mark to show where it one stood. The buildings generally are sadly decayed and ruinous, and I have seldom seen a noble building less cared for or respected. It is sad to see this result of the suppression of the religious orders, and one may be permitted to doubt whether it can be for the interest of religion that this noble foundation should now be nothing more than the private residence of a Spanish gentleman, instead of -- as it was intended it should be by its pious founder -- a perpetual refuge from the cares of the world of those in every age who aim to lead the holiest and most devoted lives."**

Street also encouraged additional study, which may have influenced Bayne's decision to make more notes than usual in his book and to complete more sketches of a single site. Street states, "I left Veruela with regret that I was unable to obtain more accurate notes of such portions of the monastic buildings probably still remain overlaid with the poor additions of a too wealthy convent during the last three centuries. It is, however, easily accessible, and the plan which I give of the church will no doubt soon induce others to complete my examination wherever it has been defective."***

Bayne's drawing of the east walk of the cloister has a number of details sketched in the top 1/6 of the sketch. Among these are a partial plan of the cloister, sections of the arcade piers, bases, window mouldings, and ribs. He also includes a detail of the ribs and clusters of columns from which the transverse arches spring. The arches on the right sides of Bayne's drawing can be compared to the photograph from L'arte Gothique. The photograph of the cloister from Monasterios shows Bayne's attention to the clusters of columns and the groining of the vaults. As in the photograph, Bayne has sketched in a table or tomb next to the right wall. Street notes that the traceries of the cloister windows are "all filled in with very thin panels of alabaster, which do not obscure the light much, whilst they effectually keep out the sun..."**** Bayne renders the windows on the left with curious marks in the openings. These probably represent the alabaster panels mentioned by Street rather than a building beyond the openings. Bayne's monogram is in the lower left and the number of the drawing in the upper left. Information about the place and date is noted in the bottom right.

* Street, Gothic Architecture in Spain, Vol. 2, 186.
** Ibid., 193-194.
*** Ibid., 194.
**** Ibid., 192.
Photo: Interior near Aspe (Monasterios), 35
Photo: Cloister detail (L'arte Gothique)
Photo: Cloister (Monasterios), 38
Street: Chapel Altar, 191
Street: Abbey Church Interior, 189

U994.30.54

SPAIN

1865/01/07

VERUELA. ENTRANCE GATE TO MONASTERY

Bayne's sketch of the entrance gate to the monastery is from a different angle than Street's. Bayne's view is from within the walled courtyard looking to the central gateway, described by Street as "finished with an octagonal stage and low crocketed spire of late date, but pierced at the base with very simple thirteenth-century archways, leading into the inner court."* The edge of the round tower to the left of the gateway is visible in Bayne's sketch. He has carefully noted the decorative grille or stonework of the window and notes by inscription and line "Chapel [?] of Mary [?] at this level."

In the upper right is a detailed drawing of the lane, which can be compared to that in Street's engraving and in the photograph of the entrance gate and outer court. Bayne notes the place and date in the lower right, signs his monogram in the lower left and numbers the drawing in the upper left.

* Street, Gothic Architecture in Spain, Vol. 2, 188.

U994.30.52

SPAIN

1865/01/07

VERUELA. PORTION OF CLOISTER

Bayne's sketch of a portion of the cloister shows the second story raised during the Renaissance. Street mentions these arcades as "all left perfectly open"* and Bayne's sketch appears to confirm this, even in its unfinished states. The arcade is just barely visible in the upper right, and only some of the corbels at the roof have been completed. The later photographs show that the arcades are now partially filled and glazed. Bayne has included enough of the sculpted details of the upper level of the cloister to make it possible to identify in the photographs.

* Street, Gothic Architecture in Spain, Vol. 2, 192.

U994.30.401

SPAIN

1865/02/12

ZAMORA. CATHEDRAL. SOUTH TRANSEPT

U994.30.402

SPAIN

1865/02/12

ZAMORA. CATHEDRAL. SOUTH TRANSEPT

U994.30.406

SPAIN

1865/02/13

ZAMORA. FACADE OF CASA DE LOS MOMOS

U994.30.404

SPAIN

1865/02/12

ZAMORA. LA MAGDALENA

U994.30.403

SPAIN

1865/02/12

ZAMORA. TOMB IN LA MAGDALENA

U994.30.405

SPAIN

1865/02/13

ZAMORA. WINDOW IN CASA DE LOS MOMOS

   
 

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