Salamanca Seville Segovia Saragosa Zamora Veruela Valladolid Valencia Tudela Toledo Tarazona Tarragona Puerto El Cuarte Poblet Pamplona Palcencia Olite Medina Malaga Lugo Lerida Leon Granada Cordoba Burgos Barcelona Avila
 
Discussion Forum
Search
 

U994.30.463

SPAIN

1865/03/04

LUGO. SAN PEDRO

U994.30.441

SPAIN

1865/03/24

MALAGA. CATHEDRAL DOOR. NORTH SIDE OF BUILDING

U994.30.407

SPAIN

1865/02/14

MEDINA DEL CAMPO. CASTLE

U994.30.408

SPAIN

1865/02/14

MEDINA DEL CAMPO. ST. MICHAEL

U994.30.27

SPAIN

1865/01/03

OLITE, PALAZIO, NORTH SIDE

Bayne's sketch #11 is a rendering of the general view of the north side of the palace with additional details of corbels and machicolations. Comparison with the photograph from History of Spanish Architecture shows that Bayne's study is reliable in showing the castle's condition at the time he viewed it. In additional to the customary information, such as the name and date at the lower right, and the monogram and number in the left hand corners, Bayne includes inscriptions beneath the tower on the left, "La Torre del Quattro Bientes?" and the gate, "Porta del Rio." In the upper left, he has four drawings of details, "Balcony in Torre del 4 Bientos," "Corbel over Porta del Rio," and two of "Machicoulis." A comparison of La Torre del Quattro Bientos with the photograph from Ars Hispania VII shows that the tower sustained damage subsequent to the time of Bayne's visit, for Bayne shows the top of the tower intact, which has since been broken into two in the photograph. Bayne has sketched two figures and a cart just to the right of the Porta del Rio, possibly to show scale. Street mentions the "two grand towers on the eastern face of the castle" that are octagonal in plan, constructed in three stages - each is within the lower and finished with a corbelled machicoulis.* One of these towers can be seen in the right quarter of Bayne's sketch and in the photograph from History of Spanish Architecture, where the three stages can be clearly seen.

* Street, Gothic Architecture in Spain, Vol. 2, 207.
Photo. Olite Castle erected for Charles the Noble. History of Span. Arch., 119
Photo. Olite. figs. 268, etx. exteriores. p. 327. Ars Hisp. VII

U994.30.22

SPAIN

1865/01/03

OLITE, PALAZIO, SOUTHWEST FACE

Bayne shows the southwest face of the palace in sketch #10. The structure on the right is probably near the keep, referred to by Street as "a large pile, with square towers at the angles; and near it is a large hall with battlemented side-walls, which has the air of being the earliest part of the castle, but into which I was unable to gain admission."* As he does not give any further description, the exact identification is speculative. From the corbelled tops, however, this structure appears to be the same as the square building in the centre of the photograph from History of Spanish Architecture. The traceried gallery between the two towers seems to be an exterior view of the same loggia shown from the inside in the photograph from Ars Hispania VIII. In addition to the identifying information in the bottom right, Bayne notes the location of the ramparts in the bottom centre, and includes his monogram and sketch number in the bottom and upper left corners respectively. A very faint image of an additional sketch of a woman with an unusual headdress or carrying something on her head is visible in the upper left corner.

* Street, Gothic Architecture in Spain, Vol. 2, 207-208.

U994.30.18

SPAIN

1865/01/03

OLITE, STA. MARIA. WEST FACADE

Two of Bayne's sketches of the parish church of Santa Maria remain in the collection. Street describes the exterior of this church, remarking that the "interior of Sta. Maria is not very interesting...."* Bayne's sketch is unfinished, for most of the carving of the archivolt is missing on the right side of the door. This sketch shows the west facade of the church with its great door, statue niches flanking the door, a round window within a pointed arch above the door, and a short bell tower that transforms from a square to an octagon. A figure can be seen at the lower right gazing at the door. An interesting feature of this drawing is the curious roof over the door supported by two columns. This is described by Street, although he does not illustrate it: "The cloister is a work of the fifteenth century, an irregular square in plan, and arcaded with a good simple open arcade. The east side has been destroyed, in order to allow of the grand western doorway of the church being seen. This [the western doorway] is protected by a penthouse roof, supported on two tall columns, which have taken the place of the old arcade...."** The west front is dated by Street to the fourteenth century. The tympanum of the door has the seated figure of Mary holding the Christ Child in the centre beneath a canopy surrounded by scenes of the Baptism, the Flight into Egypt, and the Massacre of the Innocents on the right, and the Presentation, Annunciation, and Nativity on the left. These scenes can be made out in Bayne's sketch. The photograph of the west door from Ars Hispania VII is taken from the cloisters, shown to the right in Bayne's sketch. It appears that the "penthouse roof" has been removed in the photograph. In addition to the identifying information in the lower right corner, Bayne has signed his monogram in the lower left and numbered the drawing in the upper left.

* Street, Gothic Architecture in Spain, Vol. 2, 207.
** Ibid., 206.

U994.30.666

SPAIN

1865/01/04

OLITE. METALWORK FROM HOUSES IN THE TOWN

U994.30.15

SPAIN

1865/01/03

OLITE. S. PEDRO. WEST FACADE

Bayne's second sketch of San Pedro shows the top of the tower at the south side jutting above the Western facade of the the church. The door is round-arched, with three shafts in each jamb with foliate capitals, and six orders of recessed moulded arches. The windows on either side of the door and that of the rose window above and behind the entrance have pointed arches. The roof of the church slants at a diagonal to join the bell tower on the left side. Bayne shows the manner by which the bell is hung in the tower. The photograph is taken from the roof of the building Bayne shows at the far left of his sketch. In it, a slanted buttress leading from the tower to the church appears to be similar to that shown in the small sketch above (A6b). The photograph shows the windows of the tower were blocked some time after Bayne visited the site. Bayne includes the identifying information at the lower right, his monogram at the lower left, and number of the sketch at the upper left.

U994.30.449

SPAIN

1865/01/05

OLITE. SAN PEDRO. WEST DOOR

U994.30.29

SPAIN

1865/01/03

OLITE. STA. MARIA. EAST END

Bayne's sketch of Santa Maria shows the east end of the church. Street notes that this church stands partly within the walls of the ancient palace-castle, and part of the fortified wall can be seen in the foreground and on each side of the buttressed apse of the church. The tower in the centre rising above the apse does not seem to be the same one attached to the south of the nave, seen in #8, but seems to be similar to some of those square or rectangular towers of the castle itself. Street states that the church was "built within the walls of the castle, but the cloister seems to have been thrown out beyond their line on the town side."* Bayne's sketch seems to confirm this observation. Bayne includes his usual identification and date in the lower right, monogram in the lower left, and number in the upper left.

* Street, Gothic Architecture in Spain, Vol. 2, 206.

U994.30.14

SPAIN

1865/01/03

OLITE. TOWER AT EAST END OF TOWN (SAN PEDRO)

Street discusses the remains of the "very fine castle" and two interesting parish churches in Olite, San Pedro and Sta. Maria. His engraving shows part of the castle with the tower of San Pedro behind. According to Street, "the most unusual feature is the enormous parapet, and taking to account the position of the church just at the extreme angle of the town, it may be supposed to have been built with some view to military requirements."* He considers the church to be work from the 13th century at the latest and the tower to date from the 14th. The tower, he states, is built against the south side of the church. The collection contains three of Bayne's sketches of the parish church of San Pedro. This drawing shows the tower attached to the south side of the church with an unusual faceted apse-like extension in the near view. This extension is not mentioned by Street, and Street's own illustration appears to be from the opposite side as Bayne's. The upper part of the tower in Bayne's sketch closely matches Street's illustration and description with its two upper stages pierced by windows above which is an overhanging parapet carried upon corbels. The spire is octagonal with crocketed gables above the windows at the base. In this sketch, Bayne shows the mountains around the village and notes the presence of snow on the hills to the right just above his notation of the place and date. This may refer to a comment of Street's: "I was there on a hot day in June - so hot as to make it difficult to work - and yet on the summit of the hills, lying to the south-south-west of the town, a good deal of snow was lying...." Two abstracted figures can be seen at the base of the faceted extension. Bayne has signed the sketch with his monogram at the lower left and numbered it at the upper left. At the upper right, he has added the word "Torre" [?], apparently at some later time.

* Street, Gothic Architecture in Spain, Vol. 2, 208.

   
 

© Maltwood Art Museum and Gallery. 1999.
Please send questions & comments to: maltwood@uvic.ca
Web Design: Shehani Kay
Content research: Janice Currier

Bayne Homepage Bayne Homepage Architecture Home Maltwood Home