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U994.30.461

SPAIN

1865/02/24

LAON [LEON]

U994.30.462

SPAIN

1865/02/24

LEON

U994.30.331

SPAIN

1865/02/27

LEON CATHEDRAL. FILLING OF TRACERY IN SOUTH AISLE

In this drawing, Bayne renders three details from a window he identifies as being in the south aisle. The number of the drawing is in the upper left with the location and date. Beneath the upper, unfinished sketch, Bayne provides a label, "+fylling in of tracery in the South Aisle." The lower right detail is labelled, "+figure in the same Windowe." The third detail, in the lower left, has notes above and in the margin to the left. The note at the top of the detail states, "+a bit in same window soe quainte and rude." In the note to the left, Bayne observes, "lead broad and flat." His monogram is to the right of the lower left detail.

U994.30.330

SPAIN

1865/02/27

LEON CATHEDRAL. GLASS IN SOUTH CLERESTORY WINDOW

A partially completed watercolour, this drawing shows two lights with the label, "+Leon Cathedral/ Glass in the South clerestorie Windows./ Feb. 27.65." The number of the drawing is in the upper left, and Bayne’s monogram is in the lower left corner.

U994.30.332

SPAIN

1865/02/27

LEON CATHEDRAL. TWO LIGHTS IN THE LANTERN. NORTH CLERESTORY

This drawing shows two lights and a decorative detail. The number of the drawing is in the upper left, and the date and location are given in the upper centre. Bayne’s label is in the space between the two main drawings, "+two lights in the eastern-most window of N. Clerestory. V[ery] rich in effect." The decorative detail is in the lower left corner with the label, "+crocket to the […]." There is no monogram.

U994.30.425

SPAIN

1865/02/26

LEON. CATHEDRAL. CAHPTER HOUSE TO SALE. CAP.

U994.30.424

SPAIN

1865/02/25

LEON. CATHEDRAL. NORTHWEST DOOR

U994.30.428

SPAIN

1865/02/27

LEON. CATHEDRAL. TOMB. NORTH TRANSEPT

U994.30.426

SPAIN

1865/02/26

LEON. CATHEDRAL. TOWER NEAR TO SOUTH TRANSEPT

U994.30.427

SPAIN

1865/02/26

LEON. CATHEDRAL. WEST PORCH

U994.30.335

SPAIN

1865/03/01

LEON. GLASS IN CHAPEL

In this drawing, Bayne shows a detail of a window identified as "glass in chapel." It shows a bishop or archbishop with attendant at the altar table. There is a blue background, with red in the table legs, the garments, and the upper part of the window.

U994.30.422

SPAIN

1865/02/24

LEON. S. ISODORO. SOUTH TRANSEPT

U994.30.423

SPAIN

1865/02/24

LEON. S. ISODORO. TOWER

U994.30.40

SPAIN

1865/01/05

TUDELA [LERIDA] STA. MARIA. NORTH PORTAL

Bayne appears to have mis-identified this door. He identifies the location as "Lérida," yet the date and number sequence fit only in Tudela. Furthermore, no portal could be found for a "Sta. Maria" in Lerida that matched this sketch. Yet, the photograph of the north transept from Cathedrales De España matches both Bayne's sketch and Street's description of the north transept door. Thus, it is almost certain that the location should read "Tudela" rather than "Lérida." According to Street, the capitals of this doorway include the Baptism, Herod's Feast, the head of St. John brought in a charger (on the east), St. Martin giving his cloak to a beggar, "Our Lord holding a cloth (?) and two angels worshipping," and St. Nicholas restoring two children to life (on the west side).* Street states that the north transept was at that time the "least altered part of the church...[which] recalls to mind an English building of the thirteenth century.** Bayne shows two figures in the lower part of the scene, and clearly renders the corbel-table above the doorway. He has not completed the foliate carving of the arches of the door. The monogram and number of the drawing are in the lower and upper left corners.

* Street, Gothic Architecture in Spain, Vol. 2, 203.

** Ibid., 200.

U994.30.65

SPAIN

1865/01/14

LERIDA. CATHEDRAL. DOOR TO CHAPEL. SOUTH SIDE

Bayne identifies this sketch as the Cathedral, "Door in chap[el] S[outh] side." His monogram is in the lower left and the number in the upper left corners. The photographs on this page show the extent of damage to portions of the cloister. Street notes in his description that three sides of the cloister "had been turned into barracks, a floor having been inserted all round at the level of the springing of the vault, so as to afford ample accommodation for some hundreds of soldiers, who sleep, cook and live within its walls; whilst the eastern side is now a store-house for arms and accoutrements, similarly divided by a floor, and without any visible trace of the doors of communication between the church and cloister, which are said to be on this side."* Street later observes that the arches of the three sides of the cloister had been built up and plastered. The upper photograph from Ars His VII seems to show part of this area as it later looked when some of the plaster and traceries were removed. Street mentions that "in two of those in the eastern side it is just possible to detect the commencement of traceries, from which it would seem that each arch had tracery above an arcade of three or four divisions."** The photograph from Hist. Del Arte. Hisp. shows the cloister as restored.

* Street, Gothic Architecture in Spain, Vol. 2, 133.

** Ibid., 133.

U994.30.60

SPAIN

1865/01/13

LERIDA. CATHEDRAL. NORTH TRANSEPT

This sketch is identified as the N[orth] Transept and can be compared favourably with the photographs from L’arte Gothique and L’arte Catalon., although these show the south transept as indicated by the absence of the narrow round tower visible in Bayne’s drawing and the placement of the apse at the right. The photographs are useful, however, in showing the details such as window mouldings, the engaged pilasters on the tower over the crossing, and the decoration at its top. As in the previous sketch, the lines of Bayne’s straight edge extend beyond the towers and gables. Bayne’s monogram is in the lower left, the number in the upper left, and the location and date in the lower right corners. The photograph from Early Medieval Art in Spain shows the general situation of the Cathedral from the south, which made it attractive as a fortress.

Photo: Lerida Cathedral. N. Transept. L'arts Gothique

Photo: General view. Early Med. Art in Spain, 243

Photo: From North with tower. (L'arts Catelogne)

U994.30.573

SPAIN

1865/01/14

LERIDA. CATHEDRAL. SKETCH FROM SOUTHEAST

U994.30.450

SPAIN

1865/01/14

LERIDA. CLOISTER BAY

U994.30.451

SPAIN

1865/01/14

LERIDA. NAVE ARCADE

U994.30.47

SPAIN

1865/01/13

LERIDA. S. DOOR IN CATHEDRAL IN CITADEL

In this sketch, Bayne has described the south transept doorway in its entirety. It can be compared to the photograph from L’arte Catalogne where we see the door, the monogram above the centre of the rounded arches, and flanking statue niches. Just below the cornice table, Bayne has written the inscription recorded in his notebook page discussed above. This inscription is just barely visible in the photograph. The number of the drawing is in the upper left corner. In addition to the monogram in the lower left, Bayne has also identified the place and date in the lower right corner.

Photo: South Transept door, L'arte Catalogne

U994.30.61

SPAIN

1865/01/12

LERIDA. SAN LORENZO. SKETCH OF FAÇADE OF CHURCH

San Lorenzo is mentioned by Street as one of two other old churches in Lérida. He "found it almost impossible to make even the roughest notes" of the church’s contents or dimensions because of the lack of light. He mentions an octagonal steeple added in the 15th century on the south side of the church, and this is visible in this unfinished sketch by Bayne. Some of the detail on the right side of the drawing has been filled in, but the left stills shows the initial guide lines. The drawing is important in showing Bayne’s method of work although it does not have the degree of detail of many of his sketches.

U994.30.63

SPAIN

1865/01/13

LERIDA. TOWER AT WEST SIDE OF CATHEDRAL

This drawing shows the top three stages of the south-western tower from inside the cloister. Bayne notes in the upper right, "+for details see note book." In addition, Bayne identifies the date and location in the lower right. His monogram is in the lower left and the number in the upper left corners.

U994.30.59

SPAIN

1865/01/12

LERIDA. TOWER ON WEST FACE

Street visited Lérida in the autumn, 1861, and in spring, 1862, and claims that "such a cathedral as that of Lérida is in itself worth the journey from England. Unfortnuately its examination will always be beset with difficulties — if indeed it is allowed at all when visitors become more numerous than they have been hitherto."* Bayne appears to have experienced some of these difficulties and makes several enigmatic references to these in his notebook entries.

The old cathedral had, by the time Street and Bayne visited it, long been converted into barracks. Street quotes Ford, another early traveller in Spain and author of Ford’s Handbook to Spain, to describe the condition of the church and its surrounding buildings: "’The ruin…of the old cathedral dates from 1707, when the French made it a fortress: nor has it ever been restored to pious uses….From the date of its desecration nothing whatever has been cared for; and it goes to one’s heart to see so noble a work, and one so sacred, put to such vile uses, and to so little purpose: for even now when Spain bristles with soldiers, and the whole nation is bitten with the love of military sights and sounds, the desecration of a sacred building is all that has been accomplisehd; for I believe that the Spaniards have seldom managed to hold possession of it against the French, and in its present dilapidated state are less than ever likely to do so.’"**

Both Street and Bayne discuss the date of construction. Street mentions an inscription on a stone "on the Gospel side of the choir, which I did not see, gives the date as the 22nd July, 1203; and in A.D. 1215 the cloister was, in part at any rate, built, one Raymundo de Segarra having desired that he might be buired withing its walls."*** Bayne mentions this latter date in the entry from his notebook with a sketch of the plan of the cathedral.

The tower, or steeple, shown in A30 is set against the south-west angle of the cloister. Street notes that the architect of the Micalete tower of the cathedral of Valencia was sent to Lérida to study this tower and that he imitated it even in this detail.****

Bayne’s sketch varies somewhat from the photographs of the tower in that Bayne has not drawn the windows in the lower stages, although it is possible that windows are not present on the western face. All the photographs are taken from angles that do not show the western face, and in sketches of other sides, Bayne includes the windows as they appear in the photographs. The tower in this sketch also seems lower than the 170’ Street gives as the height from the terrace of the western cloister to the top of the tower’s parapet. This is possibly unfinished, for the windows may represent those on the fourth stage rather than the fifth, for the inset fifth stage is also not visible in this sketch. Lines from his straight edge extend beyond the vertical elements of the building, giving an indication of Bayne’s method of work. In the upper left corner, Bayne sketched a detail of the arch mouldings of the windows and numbered the drawing. His monogram is in the lower left, and the date and location are given in the lower right.

* Street, Gothic Architecture in Spain, Vol. 2, 128.
** Ibid., 129.
*** Ibid., 130-131.
**** Ibid., 135.

   
 

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